Honeyball’s Weekly Round- up

Labour Party

There was an interesting article in this week’s New Statesman in which George Eaton warns that Ukip could thrive following the election. Whoever wins the election, Farage’s party will have no shortage of political ground to exploit Eaton warns.

Support for Ukip is in decline, at least this is what the polls promise. The ‘giddy’ momentum Farage’s party enjoyed following May’s European election last year is unsustainable.

It’s difficult to know for sure if the party has peaked, or as Eaton’s article suggests, the party may enjoy renewed support following the election. Typically the immediate aftermath of an election is exhausting but vigilance of the threat Ukip could pose at this point is essential.

Last week the Fabian Society published a report which laid bare some astonishing statistics relating to poverty, in particular child poverty. It said that some 2.5 million British children would wake up in a home scarred by poverty, stating: “the hidden victims of an economy that is failing to bring prosperity to typical families, and of austerity policies which hit those with least the most. These are the children forced to go without new school shoes, half-term day trips or a healthy evening meal.”

The report warned that while the economy slowly improves overall, for child poverty the story is altogether different. In fact the problem is getting worse. It estimated that 1.2 million children will fall into poverty between 2015 and 2030, this is an increase of almost half. The report predicts that low income families will suffer as a result of further benefit cuts meaning low income families will be just £200 a year better off.

Earning differentials will widen and government policies fail to help low income groups allowing them to keep pace with everyone else.
The Fabian Society has made some conservative calculations too: it projects that 3.6 million more people will slip into poverty by 2030, including 1.3 million disabled people and over half a million lone parent households.

This is not inevitable, politicians could tackle the issue of poverty, however the Tories plan to slash £12bn from the benefit system indicating that it is not in any way dedicated to doing anything about poverty which is particularly concerning considering children are one of the groups who will be most affected by their in action.