Honeyball’s Weekly Round-Up

The Conservatives were accused of putting corporate interests ahead of public health last week following a decision by the government to postpone its plans on cigarette packaging.

The Tories decision followed a vote in the European Parliament last week at which Labour MEPs today voted for 75% of packaging on cigarette products to be covered in graphic warnings, and a ban on menthol and other flavourings, as well as slims and ‘lipstick packs’, which target young people.

The statistics are clear and make a convincing argument, almost 50% of smokers will die from a smoking related disease and tobacco is still the leading cause of preventable premature deaths across Europe. More than 700,000 people a year die in the European Union as a result of smoking and 70% of those started smoking before the age of 18.

It costs the NHS millions every year and is therefore a significant public health issue, though evidently not to the Tories. We should seek ways to make smoking less attractive to young people, with a variety of flavours available, and ‘elegant’ slim packaging.

The human cost and misery which causes terrible illnesses must not be underestimated.

However, health minister Jeremy Hunt is awaiting the results of an experiment in Australia where, even despite colleagues saying they had been personally persuaded of the effectiveness of such a move.

Awaiting research is an odd decision since The Department of Health’s own research shows that plain packaging is less attractive, especially to young people, and improves the effectiveness of health warnings. Yet last week George Osborne said: “[We need to] take our time to get the right decision.” But who must the decision be right for?

The Observer dedicated its editorial to the plans, or rather postponed plans, which you can read here.

You couldn’t fail to be moved by the presence of 16-year-old Shot Pakistan schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai. She addressed the UN and said she was there to “speak up for the right of education of every child”.

Malala told the UN during her speech that books and pens scare extremists, as she urged education for all. She made other powerful statements and said “efforts to silence her had failed.” Following her attack by the Taliban, and to a standing ovation she said their actions had only made her more resolute.

You can see her speech and read more here.

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